How to Stop Hair Loss in African American Women

It’s morning. You’ve just finished getting the kids off to school.

You head upstairs to the bathroom to finish getting ready for work.

You apply your make up and style your hair.

Just as you’re tidying up your products and hair tools you see hair….EVERYWHERE.

On your shoulders, in the sink, on the floor, and in your brush.

You take an attentive look in the mirror and notice that your hair isn’t quite as thick as it once was….and you even observe you can see your scalp in some places.

The disappointment has hit an all time high. There has to be something that you can do about this antagonizing problem.

Being in the hair care business over 25 years, one thing has remained relentless, African American women are losing their hair a shocking rate.

Through the many years of aggressive hair styling techniques, African American women have severely damaged their hair follicles, sometimes beyond repair.

Some of these hostile hair styling techniques are caused by braids being too tightly woven, weaves being installed with too much tension, and tightly pulled and pinned ponytails.

Have you ever noticed little white dots on your scalp at the sides or around your hairline?

The white dots are the bulb of the hair strand lifting from your scalp. This type of scalp injury is called tension or traction alopecia.

Most times, the hair follicles are lying dormant when traction alopecia occurs. This problem can be corrected if the follicle has not died.

By flushing, and waking up the hair follicle, new hair can begin to grow.

 

Braids and Weaves Aren’t The Only Reason For Hair Loss

Another type of hair loss is temporary hair loss.

High fever, childbirth, or periods of intense stress can cause the hair to temporarily fallout. Once these conditions pass, the hair usually grows back within a few months.

Thyroid imbalance, dietary deficiency, or medications can also cause hair to fall out . This can easily be reversed and hair growth begin anew once the problem is rectified.

There are many dietary supplements that can be taken to help aid in hair growth.

Also, drinking plenty of water, eating leafy green vegetables, and getting 30 minutes of moderate exercise 3 times a week, can help encourage hair growth.

The last type is chronic hair loss, and it’s the most common.

Chronic or Androgenic alopecia is a condition in which the new hair shaft grows thinner. This state of hair loss is most noticeable during and after menopause due to hormonal adjustments.

Dihydrotestosterone, commonly known as DHT, is the main perpetrator in androgenic alopecia. DHT is a copycat of the male hormone testosterone, and will cause destruction to your hair follicles.

Blocking production of DHT can greatly decrease hair loss.

 

 There Is A Light At The End Of The Tunnel

 

If you suffer from any of these circumstances, there is no need to be distressed. There are many natural avenues you can take to help bring your hair back to its previous fame.

Using essential oils is a topical way to help heal hurting hair and scalp. Essential oils are very valuable to human skin, it’s lifeblood of the plant, and is 100% times more powerful than it’s herbal form.

For this reason, it’s always wise to dilute essential oils in a carrier oil or gel to protect human skin.

I have found that Aloe Vera Gel is a great carrier for scalp treatments because of the hydration it gives to the scalp which is crucial for excellent hair growth.

You can also use sweet almond, avocado, and jojoba oil as well.

There are many “do it yourself” scalp treatments that you can blend together to assist with hair loss.

Here are a few mixtures used in the salon for clients struggling with hair loss.

 

 

Hair Loss Scalp Treatment

Ingredients:
Aloe Vera Gel:  Aloe vera gel is for external use. The gel spreads on quickly and moisturizes, leaving no stickiness. When used externally, it is known for it’s wonderful hydrating and moisturizing properties.

Lavender Essential Oil: Helps hair loss, chemical burns on the Scalp, hair loss from nervous tension, and hair loss from high blood pressure.

Rosemary Essential Oil: Helps with hair loss, alopecia areata, fungal infections on the scalp, promotes estrogen balance, and prevents thickening of the membrane tissue around the hair follicle that results in hair loss.

*Please make a note that Rosemary increases blood circulation. If you have high blood pressure, please consult your doctor before use.

Thyme Essential Oil: Helps with dermatitis, psoriasis, and hair loss due to thinning hair shafts.

Clary Sage Essential Oil:Helps with hormonal imbalance, pre- menopause, and hair loss due to circulatory problems.

 

 

Directions:

On dry hair, gently brush the hair and scalp for 2 to 3 minutes for massage and stimulation of the hair follicles.

In a tint bottle, mix together 2 ounces of aloe vera gel with 3 to 5 drops of each of the essential oils.

On dry scalp, apply the mixture with the tint bottle to the entire scalp and massage for 3 minutes.

Place on a plastic cap and sit under a medium heat dryer for 20 minutes. (If you do not have a hooded dryer, this can also be done by placing a damp towel in the microwave for 30 seconds and wrapping it around the head. Repeat 2 to 3 times as the towel will cool.)

Shampoo, condition, and style as usual.

 

 

Alopecia Scalp Treatment:

Ingredients:
Aloe Vera Gel: Aloe vera gel is for external use. The gel spreads on quickly and moisturizes, leaving no stickiness. When used externally, it is known for it’s wonderful hydrating and moisturizing properties.

Rosemary Essential Oil: Helps with hair loss, alopecia areata, fungal infections on the scalp, promotes estrogen balance, and prevents thickening of the membrane tissue around the hair follicle that results in hair loss.

*Please make a note that Rosemary increases blood circulation. If you have high blood pressure, please consult your doctor before use.

Lavender Essential Oil: Helps hair loss, chemical burns on the Scalp, hair loss from nervous tension, and hair loss from high blood pressure.

Thyme Essential Oil: Helps with dermatitis, psoriasis, and hair loss due to thinning hair shafts.

 

Directions:

On dry hair, gently brush the hair and scalp for 2 to 3 minutes for massage and stimulation of the hair follicles.

In a tint bottle, mix together 2 ounces of aloe vera gel with 3 to 5 drops of each of the essential oils.

On dry scalp, apply the mixture with the tint bottle to the entire scalp and massage for 3 minutes.

Place on a plastic cap and sit under a medium heat dryer for 20 minutes. (If you do not have a hooded dryer, this can also be done by placing a damp towel in the microwave for 30 seconds and wrapping it around the head. Repeat 2 to 3 times as the towel will cool.)

Shampoo, condition, and style as usual.

 

Hair Growth Treatment:

Ingredients:

Aloe Vera Gel: Aloe vera gel is for external use. The gel spreads on quickly and moisturizes, leaving no stickiness. When used externally, it is known for it’s wonderful hydrating and moisturizing properties.

Geranium Essential Oil: Helps with fungal infections such as ringworm, psoriasis, eczema, and itchy scalp problems. it also cleanses oily skin and revitalizes skin cells.

Ylang-ylang Essential Oil: Helps with hair loss, oily scalp problems and stimulates new cell growth.

Pink Grapefruit Essential Oil: An astringent that possesses toning and stimulating properties and is beneficial to oily the scalp and hair.

 

Directions:

On dry hair, gently brush the hair and scalp for 2 to 3 minutes for massage and stimulation of the hair follicles.

In a tint bottle, mix together 2 ounces of aloe vera gel with 3 to 5 drops of each of the essential oils.

On dry scalp, apply the mixture with the tint bottle to the entire scalp and massage for 3 minutes.

Place on a plastic cap and sit under a medium heat dryer for 20 minutes. (If you do not have a hooded dryer, this can also be done by placing a damp towel in the microwave for 30 seconds and wrapping it around the head. Repeat 2 to 3 times as the towel will cool.)

Shampoo, condition, and style as usual.

 

Looking For Something A Little More Powerful?

I have seen many women over the years I’ve been a professional that struggle with hair loss due to aggressive hairstyling techniques. Rapid hair loss can be stressful, humiliating, and downright depressing. That’s why I have developed a 4 step system that will wake up and flush hair follicles that are lying dormant.

The Follicle Rejuvenating System is designed to work together with powerful essential oils to jump start the hair growth in the affected scalp area. This is a more “upgraded” option to the carrier and essential oils alone. Check out The Follicle Rejuvenating System and see if this just might be what you’re looking for.

 

You Can Do It!

Losing your hair can be quite disappointing and seem like a hopeless situation, but you can regain some hair that has been lost by simply applying a few changes in your hair care regimen.

You may feel like using this treatment is not for your because you visit the salon on a regular basis and don’t shampoo your own hair. Not a problem. Prepare the treatments yourself at home and bring it along with you to the salon.

Most hair stylist love to learn new ways to help keep your hair heathy and you can also direct her to this post if she is a little skeptical and wants more information.

Coming back from hair loss will take a little time, but don’t lose faith. Just continue to practice hair care regimens that promote healthy hair and you can decrease unwanted hair loss.

Be consistent, keep the faith, and you will see results.

Below are some products choices and a search bar for Amazon to find all the products and tools you’ll need to administer your scalp treatments.

 

17 thoughts on “How to Stop Hair Loss in African American Women”

  1. Hello,
    I’m debating on shaving my head bald, like amber Rose or just cutting it down even which would be very short not even finger nail length due to the hair in the middle of my head falling out.. is it best to just start over. I was told to go bald dead hair only keeps hair in the broken off places from growing, please help thank you

    1. Hi Tearra, you don’t have to necessarily shave your hair close, it depends on the size of the damaged spot. If it’s more than 3 inches wide, it will probably be easier to start over. If not, you can cover the spot with the surrounding hair until the broken spot has some length and then cut all the hair off to the shortest length. It’s all up to you, but both solutions will get you back to a full head of healthy hair. I hope this was helpful, and thanks for visiting.

  2. Im 53 soon to be 54 and 8 have noticed in the last 3-4 years that my hair seems to NOT be growing(in earlier years I could grow my hair out to shoulder lenght within 6 months,I wear a short pixie cut)now it takes forever to grow out I suppose it’s menopausal,but I’m mighty thin in the crown and I don’t know what to do.going to try some of these remedy and see how they work.

  3. Hi Stephanie,

    I’m trying to avoid breakage. I’ve stopped using oils on my scalp because I have inflammation. My dermatologist told me that applying oil directly to my scalp feeds the yeast which leads to itching which leads to breakage. But because I’m not moisturizing it in the way I am used to, I’m not sure how to move forward. Right now, I’m using a combination of prescription Clobetasol and over the counter Rogaine to treat “female pattern hair loss” but the Rogaine has led to headaches. I am going to try Viviscal again, which I used in my mid-20s and helped with thickening of my hair.

    Do you have any other natural remedies that might be helpful?

    Thank you,
    Teresa

  4. Hi Christy, I’m sorry to hear that your hair loss is causing you much sorrow. I have had clients that have suffered from hair loss after child birth and many have had success with my Follicle Rejuvenating System. It has been 12 years with your condition and that is not the best sign, but if you still have fuzz in the thinning spots, chances are the follicles are lying dormant and just need to be stimulated. You can take a look at the system here https://thehaircarecompany.org/follicle-system-instructional-video/, or by hovering over the products and clicking on The Follicle Rejuvenating System in the drop down. It’s all natural, and maybe just what you’ve been looking for. I hope this was helpful, and please keep me posted.

  5. Hi. Okay so I am suffering from breakage really badly. Before my hair was really healthy. I would wash my hair once a week (I have a really dry scalp so I HAVE to wash my hair every week) and I would straighten it. I have done this for a whole year now, Recently I saw MAJOR breakage in my hair and it so I decided so stop with the heat and just wear my hair curly (im tex-laxed). But its still breaking. When I say major breakage I mean like when I just touch my hair it falls out. So I’ve been wearing my hair like this for about 2 weeks but its only getting worse. I’ve tried hot-oil treatments, deep conditions. I don’t know what to do. Also as I am washing my hair I see clumps falling into the sink. I don’t know what is going on with it.

    Also, I had shoulder blade length hair. I got it cut and now it will not grow back. And I am always having to cut it because the breakage thins the ends and it just looks plain horrible. I do not wear weaves, or braids soooooo. I REALLY need your help!

    Sorry I was really rambling I hope this makes sense.

    1. Hi Kim, sorry that you are having trouble with excessive shedding. I’m going to suggest a protein treatment followed up by a moisturizer to immediately stop the shedding. Give yourself this treatment every 2 weeks for 2 months or until the shedding is under control, whichever comes first. If it continues, you may want to seek out a dermatologist or trichologist for further analysis. Here are a decent protein and moisturizing kit that will probably do the trick. Aphogee Balancing Moisturizer and Two-Step Protein Treatment
      I hope this was helpful.

  6. PATRICIA A RIVERS

    Hi, I am a 56 year old black female and I am ready to give up on my hair. My hair has been breaking and I am not sure what I need to do?

    1. I would love to try to help you, but I need more information about your hair. Do you wear a relaxer, color, braids, weaves, etc… Are you experiencing hair loss or breakage? Are you developing bald spots? I need more details and maybe together we can figure something out.

  7. Hello..I’m 46 and perimenopausal. I’ve always had very thick hair but in recent months..it has been shedding and is thinner. I am now taking Biotin and using a mixture of peppermint and olive oil…any other tips

    1. Hello Cynthia,
      It sounds like you are on the right track. Just make sure that you are taking other vitamins along with the Biotin and be sure to get plenty of water and exercise for 30 minutes or more at least 3 times a week. Just remember it’s a process and your situation will not change overnight. Have patience and stay the course.

  8. I’m 46 years old and for the past 5 years, I’ve noticed a change in texture and density of my hair. The hair strands are much thinner than before. I’ve been having hair shedding off and on during this time also. Mostly brought on by stressful events but then it would get somewhat under control. For a while, I was wearing clip ins to keep my hair protected and avoid styling/heat, but then I noticed the shedding and thinning areas were more aggressive in those areas where the clips were placed. I have stopped wearing clip ins but I am still experiencing more shedding again. I’ve had hormone tests done, been to a dermatologist, used essential oil treatments on the scalp (lavender, peppermint, rosemary and vitamin e with jojoba, argan, and castor oils), I’ve minimized use of heat (air dry roller sets), and my stylist does protein / moisturizing treatments about 1x/month. I’ve tried conditioning treatment hair products that are supposed to stop the shedding, but it’s STILL happening! The doctors say my hormone levels are normal, dermatologists just said “hey, it’s part of aging”. No one can tell me what is going on. I just don’t think at 46 my hair should be falling out like this! My stylist did say that she doesn’t notice any shiny bald spots or anything that would indicate the hair follicles are dead or damaged. In fact, I can see small, tiny, thin pieces of hair in certain spots….but again, the hair that may be growing in there is much more fine and thin than before. Please help! What can I do?

    1. Hi Dee,
      I totally understand what you’re going through. Unfortunately, most women around our age start to go through this. It sounds like you have made many changes to slow down the thinning process, and that’s good. The only thing that I would do is to start exfoliating your scalp 4 times a year (the change of the seasons is a good time to do this), to rid your scalp of products build up, dead skin cells, and strengthen your hair roots. You can read all about by clicking here. We exfoliate our bodies and faces and never exfoliate our scalps which is skin too. Most of my clients get this service done quarterly and all are quite pleased with it. I have many hairstylists that purchase this treatment from me and offer the service in the salon. I encourage you to mention it to your stylist and direct her to the webpage to get more information. I hope this is helpful, and wish you healthy hair success.

  9. Hello Stephanie,
    I am 56 and have been going through menopause for a couple of years now. I have not had any braids or weaves for a long time. My hair is growing, (I can put 3 plats in it), But it breaks off so bad! I wash and condition my hair, and also put a leave-in condition on it, but it still breaks off. I wear a wig and my hair is platted and protected underneath, but when I take the plats down there is balls of hair. I don’t know what to do. I would love to wear my hair naturally. Also, I am taking medicine for high blood pressure.. Thanks for your time and any suggestions.

    1. Hello,
      Aloe vera is a good moisturizer and can help to moisturize the hair so that it’s not so brittle. After shampooing just add a little aloe liquid gel to a moisturizing conditioner, cover with a plastic cap, and sit under a hot dryer for at least 15 minutes. Rinse and style as usual. This may help to stop some of the brittleness and breakage. You can check out the aloe liquid gel and moisturizing conditioner I recommend here: https://amzn.to/2y3giCD https://amzn.to/2LK63Fl

      I hope this is helpful!

  10. Corinthia Carroll

    I’m 44 years old and in 2014 I was diagnosed with CHF. I also have Fibromyalgia. I take Lisinopril mixed with HCTZ, I also take Nifedipine for high blood pressure. The crown area of my hair goes through a cycle of intense itching along with the hair breaking and thinning. It comes and goes. I’ve seen a dermatologist to get the flare ups under control. Also when I was younger I wore ponytail styles all the time. When I got older I began wearing wigs on a daily basis. These wigs had combs in them which pulled out my edges. The hair is slowly growing back in the crown area but I never know when my scalp will flare up again. As for my edges they grew just a tiny bit. Is there any hope for my hair? What are my options? Does this mean my follicles are dead? What do I do from this point? Please help….

    1. Hi Corinthia, the good news is that if there is some hair in the areas you mentioned the follicle are not dead but are probably lying dormant. Unfortunately, the medication that you are taking is probably having a significant impact on your hair growth. When you are in a situation like this, trial and error is the only way to find out if something will help your situation. I have had many clients with much success from the treatments I have to offer, and I have also treated some with no results at all. My suggestion to you would be to exfoliate your scalp first to see if that will start to control the flare-ups and calm the scalp. If that starts to help, you should then move on to Follicle Rejuvenating Treatments to stimulate hair growth.

      I hope this is helpful.

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